Your whole food, plant-based life.

Raw Food and Natural Beauty

When we are eating raw food, we start paying a lot of attention to what goes into our bodies. I thought it was time for a little reminder to think about what we are putting on our bodies, too. Our bodies are absorbing chemicals from our beauty products almost as easily as if we were eating them.

Pick up your bottle of lotion. Or your face cream. Read the ingredients. Now, go get a spoon and dig in. Obviously, I am kidding. But while we wouldn’t eat what is in the jar, we don’t think twice about slathering it all over our bodies. When we take into consideration that our skin is the biggest organ on our bodies, and is highly absorbent, I think we need to wake up and be much more aware of what we are putting on our bodies.

Think about how the medical world is now dispensing many of our drugs, through skin patches. There are patches for menopause, birth control, quitting smoking, depression, and chronic pain. The patch is even being considered for delivering insulin for diabetics. A simple patch that you place on your skin. This should alert you to what a great transportation system your skin is for drugs and chemicals.

There are quite a few great chemical free alternatives out there. Because they can be expensive, I thought I would share a few of my lo-cost, effective skin treatments with you.

My favorite skin moisturizer is Sweet Almond Oil. I actually get mine in bulk at the local co-op.  After every shower, before I dry off, I coat my skin with the oil and then towel off. Not only is the oil very moisturizing, it is quick and easy to do in the shower and if you do it while your skin is still wet, you get the extra added benefit of sealing in moisture. I love it. You can always add in a few drops of your favorite essential oil (make sure it is appropriate to put on your skin) for a beautiful fragrance.

I even add a few drops of almond oil to my hair conditioner. My hair is a bit on the dry side so the extra oil makes my hair beautifully shinny and healthy. Sweet almond oil is full of oleic and linoleic essential fatty acids. It is also a great source of vitamin E and A with a few B vitamins thrown in for good measure.

The next time you are thinking of buying that expensive, perfumed skin lotion, think sweet almond oil instead. Your outsides and your insides will thank you. I would love to hear about your natural beauty products!

For other natural beauty products, check out these posts:

Salt Rubs

Bath Salts

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  1. Belinda wrote on October 26, 2013


    I am interested in trying your mixture of oils that you mentioned in your post. Could you tell me how much of each of the oils you use in your mixture. I currently use coconut oil, but would be interested in mixing it with the oils that you mentioned.


  2. ujunwa wrote on February 3, 2013

    For thinning hair Castor oil is great. It makes the hair to grow in a short time. For my skin being in a hot climate in Africa I use a mixture of Coconut oil, olive oil, sweet almond oil, grape seed oil and drops of sweet orange oil. I have amazing glowing skin even with the hot weather. I haven’t looked this great in all my years of using expensive store bought lotions and this is just under two months of going natural.

  3. Françoise Mathieu wrote on March 6, 2011

    There’s a great new book that’s just come out called “there’s lead in your lipstick” by Gill Deacon (no relation of mine I just loved it) that talks all about toxins in beauty products AND gives you recipes for healthy alternatives. She also names some “greenwashed” brands who claim to be green when they aren’t. I highly recommend it. I gave it to my 13 year old and her friends and they were shocked and immediately started making their own products instead. Scary when you read it .

  4. Tguch wrote on March 3, 2011

    Hi ! I wash my face with raw honey- it is water soluble and leaves my skin soft and clean. No need for moisturizer! I make my own body lotion from coconut oil, shea butter and cacao butter. I am excited to try these other oils for my hair and wrinkles that are mentioned above. Thank you so much everyone for sharing!

  5. Emma wrote on January 20, 2011

    About the oat groat tea- how exactly does one prepare that? Does one add steeped tea to the ground oats or just hot water…?

    Any details are much appreciated!

  6. Susan - Canada wrote on December 28, 2010

    I’d love to use Manuka Honey as a moisturizer. I’m sure I should mix it with some oil because it is quite thick. I’m just not sure of the ratio I should use for each. Any ideas out there? Thanks.

  7. Daphne wrote on November 18, 2010

    I prepare and use shea butter and glycerin for my lotion now instead of commercial products, and I have noticed how soft my skin has become. I use african shea butter as my sunscreen.

  8. Karen Apostolova wrote on November 12, 2010

    Hey Julie, I saw the shea butter to sell in one vegan shop, but I ve never tried. I really want to try it. And now that you are saying is so good I will try it. I m hearing a lot of people talking about damascena rose oil or mosqueta rose oil for the wrinkles around eyes. I tried a tester and is phenomenal! I have to buy it! :) Now for the body I m using the coconut oil, the same used for the deserts, and it gives to my skin such of softness, like a baby skin. I could not believe just the coconut butter could make it. Thanks to everybody for share all this information, this blog is so good for having this such of discussion here.

  9. Kathy wrote on November 11, 2010

    I bought a “do it yourself” natural beauty products book called “Organic Body Care Recipes: 175 Homeade Herbal Formulas for Glowing Skin & a Vibrant Self” by Stephanie Tourles, a bit over two years ago. It has some great recipes to take care of the body head-to-toe. There are some simple ideas for masks, cleansers, scrubs, shampoos, and conditioners that you can make with fresh ingredients and kitchen staples. There’s a fantastic recipe for an all-in-one scrub/cleanser/mask that is made out of ground oats and sunflower seeds hat can be kept in a jar for up to a year– I tripled the recipe last year and gave it to all my friends as a stocking stuffer!

  10. Sarah Mendenhall wrote on November 9, 2010

    I use all natural organic handmade soap and moisturize with olive oil scented with a few drops of vanilla, I love how fresh my face looks and feels!


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