Your whole food, plant-based life.

Raw Lavender Lemon Tea Cookies

Spring has come so early to so many parts of the country this year. Normally, I would still be shoveling and instead I am picking dandelion greens! I am not sure how I feel about this, being a snow and winter lover. But ever the optimist, I have decided to jump into spring with both feet. Even if I am missing the snow, it doesn’t mean that I can’t get into the mood with these easy little raw Lavender Lemon Tea Cookies. The ingredients are easy to find, no dehydrator is needed and they come together in a snap. A true taste of spring, lemon and lavender love keeping company.



The base of these delicate little cookies is cashew flour that you can make yourself in your high-speed blender. Cashews are wonderful nuts for desserts. Don’t let their mild, sweet flavor deceive you. Cashews have a wonderful nutritional profile. Cashews are full of anti-oxidants and that is good for your heart. They have a lower fat content than most other nuts, and the fat that is in cashews is considered healthy fat. Approximately 75% of the fat in cashews is unsaturated fatty acids. The unsaturated fatty acid content is oleic acid which can actually lower cholesterol. Cashews are also a great source of magnesium, which is not only great for your bones, but also helps to keep you calm and relaxed.



Raw Lavender Lemon Tea Cookies


  • 3 cups cashew flour
  • 1/2 cup almond flour*
  • 2 tablespoons lavender, divided
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 2 tablespoons raw agave nectar (or liquid sweetener of choice)
  • 1/2 cup dried coconut
  1. To make the cashew flour: Process cashews 1/2 cup at a time in high-speed blender. Sift and re-blend the chunks until you have a silky flour. Don’t over blend or you will get cashew butter. 1 cup of raw cashews makes aproximately 1 1/2 cups of flour.
  2. Mix together cashew flour, almond flour, 1 tablespoon of the lavender, lemon juice, zest, vanilla, coconut oil and agave.
  3. Roll into balls and set aside.
  4. Powder the coconut in a high-speed blender or coffee grinder. Mix together with remaining 1 tablespoon lavender and roll the balls in this mixture.
  5. Chill to set.

*I used almond flour that I made from almonds with the skins removed for this recipe. It is not necessary for the taste but is prettier in the picture!

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  1. Fennel & Fern wrote on August 20, 2014

    This is such a lovely recipe. I wondered if you wanted to add it to our lavender recipe link up that we’re doing.

  2. Elle wrote on February 9, 2014

    Could honey or maple syrup be used instead of agave without altering the flavor too much? Agave makes me feel nauseous so I can’t use it…

  3. Roxanne wrote on October 20, 2013

    I was at a picnic/tea party recently and someone made these, I ate one and was in love with this recipe! I’ve made them two days in a row for parties we have attended and both times the plates were empty by the time we left! Delicious and I’ve passed on the link to this recipe countless times already. Thank you for posting!

    • Susan wrote on October 20, 2013

      Hi, Roxanne! Thank you so much for letting me know! Glad you are enjoying the recipe.

  4. Patti wrote on September 27, 2013

    I just returned from a wonderful vacation in Provence and brought home some lavender in hopes of making some raw food gifts for friends! These tea cookies are perfect. I love the combination of lavender, lemon and almonds. I always know when I try one of your recipes Susan, it will be delicious! Thanks again Susan. Can’t wait to make these later today.

  5. Kells wrote on July 10, 2013

    These cookies are delicious; so refreshing and light! However, I found that the taste wasn’t very uniform…and I blame it entirely on my blender. I made both of the almond and cashew flour with a Nutribullet, and found it grueling and tiresome; I never got a uniform consistency, it was either nut butter or chunky flour :/ With that said, what blender/food processor do you use to make these nut flours? I know you mentioned “high-speed”, but I’m not sure if that fixes the problem?

    Thank you for this recipe – its a new family favorite (and I’m surrounded by heavy meat-eaters…they love em!)

    • Susan wrote on July 11, 2013

      Kells, I use a Vitamix. It would be difficult to get really good results with a Nutribullet for this. Cheers!

  6. Kathleen wrote on July 4, 2013

    How many cashews should I pick up to make three cups of flour? Do you soak the almonds before you grind them? Thanks! Looks fantastic!

    • Susan wrote on July 4, 2013

      If you note in the recipe, it states that 1 cup of cashews will give you about 1 1/2 cups cashew flour. Also, if it doesn’t say to soak the almonds, you don’t have to. They should be used dry. If you prefer to soak your almonds and dehydrate them to release the enzyme inhibitors, you certainly can do that.

  7. Susan wrote on June 25, 2013

    Either will work. :-)

  8. Leanna wrote on June 25, 2013

    When you say mix, do you mean by hand or with a food processor? Thank you for a great recipe

  9. Laura wrote on June 22, 2013

    Super easy. Amazing!!! Thank you. Will share!

  10. Elenie Smith wrote on May 30, 2013

    Hello, I am totally new to your site. And I am loving the possibilities. But I see that you use a lot of cashews in your recipes. I LOVE cashews. Ate them ALL the time. But have just discovered that there is something in cashews, Tryptophan, which puts me into a mental la la land. I thought I was just cruisie. I think i will need to substitute almonds or other nice nuts. Would that be OK too?

    • Susan wrote on June 2, 2013

      Every nut has a different taste and texture. They are not interchangeable in recipes. Some can be, pine nuts can work in desserts, and some sauces but each recipe is different. :-)


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